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Lawrence Rosenberg - My philosophy

The Difference of One


April 1, 2015 marked an important date in the history of health care in Quebec. It was the day Law 10 took effect, but more importantly it was the day we truly began to reimage what we could do for our patients, clients and residents.

As West-Central Montreal Health continues to grow and mature, one of our most important objectives is to keep improving the user experience.

To some in our network, this might be known as the “client experience”, the “resident experience” or the “patient experience”. Whatever the name, the concept is the same: providing the best care to those we serve.

Otherwise said, we need to do everything in our power to show empathy for those we care for and work with, while treating everyone with respect and compassion.

I invite you to take a moment and watch a special video that was filmed at six of our network’s sites. This video highlights the exceptional work of staff, while in the same moment allowing each of us to walk in the shoes of not only those who receive care, but provide care.

 


Compassion by Design




People come to the hospital trusting us with their lives. Yet, once they enter through our doors, these individuals may feel vulnerable, anxious and perhaps even fearful. 

We can help patients and their families deal with physical and psychological ailments, but if our actions lack a human touch, then what are we contributing to the patient experience? 

At every moment—whether during a phone call, a clinic visit, a blood test, a surgical procedure or an admission—we are duty-bound to care for patients with compassion.

As you move through the hospital each day, imagine how you can draw upon the power of compassion to restore a patient’s sense of dignity and well-being. As you head to your office, watch for anyone who seems lost. Before you let voicemail pick up a call, bear in mind that each person may be desperate for you to answer. When reviewing a medical chart with a patient, take a moment to ask how they are feeling, and do so with warmth and a smile.

A kind gesture. A thoughtful word. An act of reassurance. They’re not much, when you think about it. But to each person, they can make all the difference between routine treatment and an exceptional patient experience.

 

Lawrence Rosenberg, M.D., Ph.D.
Executive Director