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Virtual Exhibit - Dietetics

Since the very beginning of he Hospital’s history, the Dietetics  service has the role to feed patients, visitors and  staff according to the Kosher’s Jewish dietary law. We can learn about living with Jewish customs within a hospital by taking a look at the Dietetics’ archives fonds, but also about our history, as we can see by looking at the mentions of the Dietetics service in the annual reports of the JGH.

In 1936, the Hospital had its own farm, cultivating many fruits and vegetables to save money, while the foodstuffs kept getting more expensive. In order to take advantage as much as possible of the crops, the Hospital did its own canning to use throughout the year.

In 1942, the reality of the Second World War shows in the way the Dietetics work. The farm increases the production and contributes to the war effort. By having its own farm, the Hospital is already applying the government’s recommendation to grow “Victory Crops”  in times when the food was strictly rationed.

In 1943, we can see in the annual report that the Auxiliary gave a big help in canning the crops.

In 1947, the farm is still active and allowed to get tons of crops such as tomatoes, carrots, onions, beets, cabbages, lettuce, celery, cucumbers, corn, pears and beans. 

The second part of the historical perspective on the Dietetics at the JGH is visual.  Please take a look at the images galleries below.  Look at the first one to see the service throughout the years and the second one to see how the menus distributed to the patients used to look like before the system’s computerization in 2005.